A Financial Times (FT) analysis of the number of deaths from the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic in 14 countries found that the number of deaths could be up to 60% higher than the numbers reported.

According to mortality statistics, there is an excess of 122,000 deaths, compared to the normal levels in these places, which is considered much higher than the 77,000 deaths reported by COVID-19 reported by the authorities, coinciding in places and time periods.

A chart showing how deaths from all causes have skyrocketed in countries around the world during the Covid-19 coronavirus outbreaks.
A chart showing how deaths from all causes have skyrocketed in countries around the world during the Covid-19 outbreaks.

According to the FT analysis, if this pattern is replicated in countries around the world, the global number of Covid-19 deaths would increase from the current official total of 201,000 to 318,000.

How do we know these are excess coronavirus deaths?

To calculate excess deaths, the Financial Times has compared deaths from all causes in the weeks of the outbreak in March and April 2020 with the average for the same period between 2015 and 2019. They found that the number of 122,000 equates to a 50 percent increase in overall mortality, relative to the historical average for the locations studied.

According to the analysis, overall deaths increased by 60% in Belgium, by 51% in Spain, by 42% in the Netherlands, and by 34% in France during the pandemic compared to the same period in previous years.

Some of these deaths may be the result of causes other than COVID-19, as people avoid hospitals for other ailments. But excess mortality has increased more steeply in the worst COVID-19 outbreaks, suggesting that most of these deaths are directly related to the virus and not simply the side effects of healthcare overload.

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The new virus has killed a lot more people than what is being reported

Stay tuned and check out our coronavirus section on GuruGamer.com for more news and updates on the complex developments of the dangerous new coronavirus, COVID-19.